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Gifted Services and Acceleration Information

over 4 years ago

Gifted and Talented (known as CCATS) is NOT the same as classroom differentiation, subject acceleration, or grade acceleration. Please see the information below for more details! 

CCATS Faculty In-Service for Gifted Procedures

2015-16

 

1.     Define Gifted –

According to the Alabama Administrative Code (AAC), “Intellectually gifted children and youth are those who perform or who have demonstrated the potential to perform at high levels in academic or creative fields when compared with others of their age, experience, or environment. These children and youth require services not ordinarily provided by the regular school program. Children and youth possessing these abilities can be found in all populations, across all economic strata, and in all areas of human endeavor." Creativity, in this definition, refers to problem-solving abilities.

 

2.     Enrichment vs. Gifted –

There are two models of program services for gifted students in   Alabama. Both models must follow the Alabama Administrative Code (AAC). However, the identification of students is what defines the program. Gifted Program identifies students using the Alabama State Department of Education (SDE) Gifted Eligibility Determination Form and requires a gifted certified specialist to facilitate services. Enrichment Program identifies gifted students plus an additional talent pool using a state-approved, multiple criteria eligibility matrix and requires a gifted certified specialist to facilitate services.

An Enrichment Program should not be confused with the term enrichment, which is any supplemental activity that is above and beyond the core curriculum standards offered in any classroom and may be administered or facilitated by any certified teacher or mentor.

 

3.     Are there other guidelines that set requirements for gifted programs? - Yes. Each school system has a state approved Local Education Agency (LEA) Plan for Gifted that outlines gifted processes and services.

 

4.     What laws do I need to be aware of that apply to gifted students?

Act 106 and the Alabama Administrative Code (AAC) set out Alabama’s requirements for educating students identified as gifted. 

 

5.     Why is gifted part of special education?

Gifted students have unique learning needs that require special education services, or interventions, in order for these students to reach their potential. Frequently, gifted students do not achieve high grades, high scores on standardized tests, and may have discipline issues.

 

6.     Are all children gifted/talented?

No. All children do have abilities and can excel. However, the brains of gifted students work differently than normal students. In their area(s) of giftedness, these students must learn at a faster pace and have depth and complexity in content and activities. Otherwise, this information will be miss-learned or students will underachieve.

 

7.     What are the unique learning needs of gifted students?

Gifted students may be gifted in one domain or subject area, such as math or science, in all subjects, and/or in creativity, or problem-solving. In their area(s) of giftedness, students must have accelerated pacing, depth, complexity, creative expression, and emphasis on affective needs.  Affective needs include asynchronous development, overexciteabilities, intensities, intellectual peer relationships, perfectionism, social-emotional needs, autonomous learning, and executive skills.

 

8.     Who can refer a child for gifted?

A student may be referred for consideration for gifted services by teachers, counselors, administrators, parents or guardians, peers, self, and other individuals with knowledge of the student’s abilities.

 

9.     When can a student be referred for gifted services?

A student may be referred if they are enrolled in the public school system and are at least 6 years of age. Referral requests may be submitted at any time.

 

10.  How are gifted students identified?

For each student referred, information is gathered in the areas of Aptitude, Characteristics, and Performance.  The information is entered on a matrix where points are assigned according to established criteria.  The total number of points earned determines if the student qualifies for gifted services.

 

11.  What services are available to gifted students?

Services for gifted students may vary between school systems. The Local Education Agency (LEA) Plan for Gifted outlines the services provided. Generally, services provided are:

Grades K-2-Consultative-Gifted specialists consult with classroom teachers to provide differentiated activities, lessons, or stations.

Grades 3-5/6-Pull-out Classes-Gifted specialists work with gifted students in a resource room for 3-5 hours per week through concept-based curriculum which incorporates, problem-based and service learning.

Grades 6/7-8-Pull-out, advanced classes, electives- this varies from school system to school system. Most systems provide services through advanced classes or advanced classes and electives.

Grades 9-12-Advanced classes, electives, counseling services for college and career preparation.  Advanced classes may include but are not limited to dual enrollment, International Baccalaureate (IB), Honors, Advanced Placement (AP), etc.

 

 

 

12.  Can a student be gifted and disabled?

Yes, a student may be twice exceptional (2e) if they have a disability area identified and are identified gifted. Sometimes the disability masks the giftedness, and sometimes the giftedness masks the disability.

 

13.  Can a gifted student who is struggling in a content area be referred to the PST or Special Education?

Yes.  Giftedness can mask learning problems or disabilities.

 

14.  Can a student be subject or grade accelerated in Alabama?

Yes. Each school system is required to have state approved acceleration procedures. We have a referral process that requires paperwork and consent from parents. Please talk with a gifted specialist before attempting to accelerate!

 

15.  What about the classwork in the general education classroom that a gifted student misses while attending gifted pull-out or gifted activities?

According to the Alabama Administrative Code,

“Students will not be required to make up missed class work."

 

 

Questions?

You may contact one of the gifted specialists:

Christina Purdy  purdycm@chambersk12.org

Robbye Smith     smithrc@chambersk12.org

Mindee Allen      allenmi@chambersk12.org

Acceleration Procedures and Gifted Services Presentation

over 3 years ago

Chambers County Acceleration Policy

 

Rationale


The Chambers County School System believes in the philosophy of assisting all students in developing their academic potential.


To meet the needs of high-end learners we offer the options of differentiation, subject acceleration, and grade acceleration.


The Alabama Exceptional Child Education Act mandates that the school district provides appropriate instruction and related services for such exceptional children at public expense.


The Alabama Administrative Code lists acceleration as an appropriate service delivery option on page 573.


General Guidelines


Any student in any grade in the district may be referred for consideration for acceleration by any employee or a parent.


A committee consisting of a gifted specialist, the principal, the current general education teacher, and any other appropriate member (counselor, parent, other grade-level teachers).


The committee will follow the written procedures starting with Level I (differentiation), Level II (subject acceleration) for a grading period if possible, before Level III (grade acceleration) is considered.


The committee may proceed directly to Level III if differentiation has been tried or they feel documentation warrants.


All staff members should be aware of the procedures for acceleration.


The process will take place in a timely and logical fashion.


The best times for consideration are at the start of school or the beginning of the second semester.


The referral process will begin at the school site.


Information and documentation should be gathered in a timely manner.


Level I: Differentiation Procedures


The committee will conduct a fair and thorough evaluation of the students educational needs.


The committee will use achievement test results, grades, work samples/products, and aptitude.


The committee will provide the general education teacher with differentiation options to modify the curriculum and instruction.


If the strategies are successful, the student will remain in the present placement. The committee will reconvene at the end of the year to develop a plan for the upcoming year.


The principal will consider the differentiation needs and ensure the student is with a teacher knowledgeable of gifted learners and trained in differentiation.

Steps 3 & 4 are waived if considering subject acceleration.


Level II: Subject Acceleration


If subject acceleration is considered, the receiving teacher should be added to the committee.


A referral form for acceleration and parent permission must be completed.


Any additional individual assessments will be conducted.


After considering collected data the committee decides that subject acceleration is appropriate, the students desire will be considered and parents will be notified and permission obtained.


The Acceleration Determination and Approval Form and the Acceleration Plan must be completed by the committee.


If the student or parent is not in favor then the student will not be accelerated.


Level II: Subject Acceleration Continued


The committee will reconvene after a grading period to see if needs are being met. If so, the plan will remain in place until the end of the year when they will meet again to develop a plan for the next school year.


The principal will ensure that the student is assigned to the appropriate teacher to meet the needs of the student.


If the committee determines that subject acceleration has not met the academic needs of the student, then grade acceleration will be considered.


At this time, the gifted coordinator must be included on the committee.


Level III: Grade Acceleration


Students being considered for whole grade acceleration will be evaluated using a process approved by the Alabama State Dept. of Education (Iowa Acceleration Scales) to be completed by the gifted specialist.


The acceleration process should include a review of all previously collected information (aptitude and achievement scores, grades, work products), birth date, physical description, social/emotional maturity, documentation of previous attempts to meet academic needs, and input from the student, parents, general education teacher, and gifted specialist.


If not already done, a referral for gifted services will be initiated.


The Acceleration Determination and Approval Form will be completed.


If the committee decides not to accelerate, the parent is allowed to review the information considered.


Level III: Grade Acceleration Continued

If the committee approves grade acceleration, the Acceleration Plan will be completed including a transition period for the student.


The committee will need to reconvene at least annually to review the students progress and social/emotional adjustment.


Middle and high school administration, counselors, and teachers may need to be included, along with instructional specialist to ensure the students progression throughout his/her academic school career.


Subject and grade acceleration is occurring throughout the county and should be considered for students whose academic needs are not being met in the regular classroom.


Chambers County Gifted Program

How it Works

•Chambers County Schools follow the Alabama State Department of Education’s guidelines for gifted education.
•In grades K-2, the gifted specialist serves as a consultant to classroom teachers and assists in providing resources, centers, and strategies for high achieving students.
In grades 3-7, identified students are placed and served in the Gifted Resource Class (GRC) which is taught by the gifted teacher, as well receiving classroom accommodations as needed.
2nd Grade Child Find Procedures

A child can be referred for gifted services in ANY grade by teachers, parents, administrators, or even by the student.  However, in second grade ALL students are screened to determine if they should be referred.

The gifted resource class typically does not become an option until 3rd grade.  Therefore, there is a process in place to identify students who need to begin their GRC services in 3rd grade.  That process is called Second Grade Child Find.  It is a part of the Alabama State Department Code for Gifted Education.

2nd Grade Child Find Process

•In the fall semester, the gifted teachers visit all 2nd grade classes to do higher level thinking and creativity lessons and to collect sample products from each child.  The gifted teacher assists the classroom teacher in documenting gifted characteristics observed in each child.
In the fall, the psychometrist/gifted specialist give every 2nd grader the N-NAT 2 test.
Parental permission is required for referrals to be initiated. 

Each referral is followed by collection of data including student products, teacher rating scale, STAR results, and test results from the N-NAT 2 and/or OLSAT    

A committee convenes to score the products and place all data and scores on a state mandated screening matrix.
The committee uses the matrix score to determine if a student is eligible for the gifted program, needs further testing, or currently does not meet screening qualifications for the program.
Parents are notified of the committee’s decision in writing. 
Students who need further testing receive an individual intelligence test from a psychometrist.

Students need at least a score of 118 on an IQ test or 87th percentile on a creativity test to qualify.

What about 3rd through 7th Grade Referrals?


Gifted teachers screen the OLSAT and ASPIRE scores every year looking at National Percentiles and a student’s school ability index.


Teachers/Parents/and sometimes students refer themselves for screening.


Permission is sent home to screen a student.  The student is given a screening test if needed by the gifted teacher.


A TABs Observation form is completed by the classroom teacher ranking all students in the class in ten separate categories.


Entire class work products are gathered as part of the referral. Products are ranked by the classroom teacher and gifted teacher and given a score by the gifted teacher. STAR and Global Scholar scores are also collected.


Whats next? 


All of the information is given to the  gifted education teacher.


A meeting between the gifted teacher, regular ed. teacher, and principal is held.


The information is plugged into the state mandated matrix of multiple criteria to see if the student meets the requirements for the gifted education automatically or needs to be given additional testing.

Parents of students who qualify for the gifted education program are invited to a placement meeting.


Is that all?


Students who require additional testing will be given an IQ test (verbal and nonverbal) or a Torrance Test of Creative Thinking by the psychometrist.


Those scores will then be plugged into the state mandated matrix of multiple criteria.

 

Gifted Service in Grades K-1


The gifted teacher is available to assist Kindergarten and First Grade teachers in meeting the needs of advanced learners. 

Students in these early grades can usually be well served by regular classroom differentiation strategies.

The best practice is for classroom teachers to avoid using the term “gifted” when speaking with parents and students.  It is difficult to predict whether or not a student will be referred for gifted testing in 2nd grade, and we do not want to create unreasonable expectations for them. 

The gifted teacher is always available to talk with parents and teachers should refer them to her when they have questions about the gifted program.


The Gifted Specialist


The gifted teacher can assist you in the following ways:

Help you to find resources for learning centers and activities that would be appropriate for high end learners.  Some materials are available for checkout in her office and others are on the shared server.
Provide training to you in differentiating curriculum.
•Serve as a referral source for parents who have questions about the gifted program.


Services in Upper Grades


•In grades 3-5 students are pulled out of the regular class to visit the resource room for 5 ½ hours one day every other week. The gifted teacher also works with the classroom teacher to assist with classroom accommodations as needed.
In grades 6-7 students are pulled out of the regular class to visit the resource room for 2 hours one day every other week. The gifted teacher also works with the classroom teacher to assist with classroom accommodations as needed.

In high school, advanced placement classes are  available, as well as dual enrollment in college curriculum.

Other Information


Each student pulled to a resource room has a Gifted Education Plan that describes the units of study in the gifted classroom. We will send an e-mail to teachers describing the units of study for the year.

The gifted teachers will notify schools if classes must be canceled. We will make up any canceled classes at some point during the school year.


A child may not be held from gifted services because of behavior or academic problems. Please talk to the gifted teacher if there is an issue.


Gifted students receive a report card from the gifted teacher twice a year measuring academic behaviors, thinking behaviors, and motivating and social behaviors.


Other Information Continued


Copies of referrals and TAB’s forms will be e-mailed to teachers upon request.


Updates from the State Department will be given in September along with our racial equity numbers. 

If you have any questions or concerns, please e-mail us!


Make-Up Work

Gifted teachers will come to each school to have you sign the Accommodations Forms.

Do not assign class work that was completed or started in class while the gifted students were in the resource room or attending a gifted activity as homework or catch-up work.


If new concepts are introduced while the students are in the resource room, teachers must provide peer or teacher instruction of the new material before work or homework is assigned.

Gifted students are not responsible for any class work missed while in the resource room except a test.

Underachievement


Many gifted students will not participate in rote skills and repetitive assignments.


Gifted students learn at a faster pace and become bored and turned off easily.


Consider compacting material already mastered.


Encourage students to try. Some are scared of failure so they won’t attempt.


Be flexible!


Twice Exceptional


Students may be gifted in one area while having a learning disability in another area.


Disabilities include ADHD, hearing impaired, vision impaired, LD, autistic, sensory impaired, ED, dyslexic, and many others.


A student may be gifted in math and have a learning disability in reading. Both areas must be addressed.


Many times a students giftedness is masked by the disability or vice versa.

Social and Emotional Needs


Many gifted children have a low self-concept due to asynchronous development.


Regular education teachers should consult with the gifted teacher or counselor as needed to address the needs of gifted learners.


The majority of high school drop-outs are gifted students.


Gifted students are often the target of bullies. 

 for Gifted Procedures

2015-16

 

1.     Define Gifted –

According to the Alabama Administrative Code (AAC), “Intellectually gifted children and youth are those who perform or who have demonstrated the potential to perform at high levels in academic or creative fields when compared with others of their age, experience, or environment. These children and youth require services not ordinarily provided by the regular school program. Children and youth possessing these abilities can be found in all populations, across all economic strata, and in all areas of human endeavor." Creativity, in this definition, refers to problem-solving abilities.

 

2.     Enrichment vs. Gifted –

​There are two models of program services for gifted students in   Alabama. Both models must follow the Alabama Administrative Code (AAC). However, the identification of students is what defines the program. Gifted Program identifies students using the Alabama State Department of Education (SDE) Gifted Eligibility Determination Form and requires a gifted certified specialist to facilitate services. Enrichment Program identifies gifted students plus an additional talent pool using a state-approved, multiple criteria eligibility matrix and requires a gifted certified specialist to facilitate services.

An Enrichment Program should not be confused with the term enrichment, which is any supplemental activity that is above and beyond the core curriculum standards offered in any classroom and may be administered or facilitated by any certified teacher or mentor.

 

3.     Are there other guidelines that set requirements for gifted programs? - Yes. Each school system has a state approved Local Education Agency (LEA) Plan for Gifted that outlines gifted processes and services.

 

4.     What laws do I need to be aware of that apply to gifted students?

Act 106 and the Alabama Administrative Code (AAC) set out Alabama’s requirements for educating students identified as gifted. 

 

5.     Why is gifted part of special education?

Gifted students have unique learning needs that require special education services, or interventions, in order for these students to reach their potential. Frequently, gifted students do not achieve high grades, high scores on standardized tests, and may have discipline issues.

 

6.     Are all children gifted/talented?

No. All children do have abilities and can excel. However, the brains of gifted students work differently than normal students. In their area(s) of giftedness, these students must learn at a faster pace and have depth and complexity in content and activities. Otherwise, this information will be miss-learned or students will underachieve.

 

7.     What are the unique learning needs of gifted students?

Gifted students may be gifted in one domain or subject area, such as math or science, in all subjects, and/or in creativity, or problem-solving. In their area(s) of giftedness, students must have accelerated pacing, depth, complexity, creative expression, and emphasis on affective needs.  Affective needs include asynchronous development, overexciteabilities, intensities, intellectual peer relationships, perfectionism, social-emotional needs, autonomous learning, and executive skills.

 

8.     Who can refer a child for gifted?

A student may be referred for consideration for gifted services by teachers, counselors, administrators, parents or guardians, peers, self, and other individuals with knowledge of the student’s abilities.

 

9.     When can a student be referred for gifted services?

A student may be referred if they are enrolled in the public school system and are at least 6 years of age. Referral requests may be submitted at any time.

 

10.  How are gifted students identified?

For each student referred, information is gathered in the areas of Aptitude, Characteristics, and Performance.  The information is entered on a matrix where points are assigned according to established criteria.  The total number of points earned determines if the student qualifies for gifted services.

 

11.  What services are available to gifted students?

Services for gifted students may vary between school systems. The Local Education Agency (LEA) Plan for Gifted outlines the services provided. Generally, services provided are:

Grades K-2-Consultative-Gifted specialists consult with classroom teachers to provide differentiated activities, lessons, or stations.

Grades 3-5/6-Pull-out Classes-Gifted specialists work with gifted students in a resource room for 3-5 hours per week through concept-based curriculum which incorporates, problem-based and service learning.

Grades 6/7-8-Pull-out, advanced classes, electives- this varies from school system to school system. Most systems provide services through advanced classes or advanced classes and electives.

Grades 9-12-Advanced classes, electives, counseling services for college and career preparation.  Advanced classes may include but are not limited to dual enrollment, International Baccalaureate (IB), Honors, Advanced Placement (AP), etc.

 

 

 

12.  Can a student be gifted and disabled?

Yes, a student may be twice exceptional (2e) if they have a disability area identified and are identified gifted. Sometimes the disability masks the giftedness, and sometimes the giftedness masks the disability.

 

13.  Can a gifted student who is struggling in a content area be referred to the PST or Special Education?

​Yes.  Giftedness can mask learning problems or disabilities.

 

14.  Can a student be subject or grade accelerated in Alabama?

Yes. Each school system is required to have state approved acceleration procedures. We have a referral process that requires paperwork and consent from parents. Please talk with a gifted specialist before attempting to accelerate!

 

15.  What about the classwork in the general education classroom that a gifted student misses while attending gifted pull-out or gifted activities?

​According to the Alabama Administrative Code,

“Students will not be required to make up missed class work."

 

 

Questions?

You may contact one of the gifted specialists:

Christina Purdy  purdycm@chambersk12.org

Robbye Smith     smithrc@chambersk12.org

Mindee Allen      allenmi@chambersk12.org

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